Poetry Month

April is Poetry Month, and because of the fascinating Haiku workshop and poetry reading we’re having later this month, both presented by local author and poet Claudia Radmore, we’re thinking about rhyming. Yes, we understand you don’t have to rhyme in order to have a good poem, but it’s usually the first thing we think of when we talk about poetry.

A few years back, we included a fun link to a list of 19 words in the English language that don’t rhyme. One of them is orange. Mental Floss has gone one better, and includes a list with 23 words—and “words” that actually do rhyme with them! (Okay, some are suspect…including names.) See if you can think of any others.

Happy rhyming!

 

read the rest of the list here.  Can you think of any more?

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Do you Haiku?

April is Poetry Month, and we’re celebrating! Do you want to learn more about Haiku? Discover the real power of the smallest poems in the world. See how just a few words can open a universe, and learn how to write them. “The Power of Haiku” takes place on Tuesday, April 10th at 6pm.

This wonderful event will be presented by Claudia Radmore, author of Fish Spine Picked Clean. Registration is required, so please call the library to find out how to get on the list. Spaces are limited. Trust us, you won’t want to miss this.

Did a Machine Write this?

backgroundCuratedAi is a new literary magazine that only includes work by….wait for it….robots.  Yes, this magazine features poetry and short stories written by A.I. machines, for people.  The editing is still done by humans, but they claim to keep a very light touch on entries. And honestly, some of the work isn’t that bad.

If you pop to the sight, you can read short poems that will make you stop and think twice. How did they do it? Why doe this work? They aren’t giving away many secrets about this yet. But the CBC website has a fun quiz for humans to take to see if you can tell the difference between AI Poetry, and CanLit.  How will you score? (Okay, I got 100%, so maybe the machines need a little more work?)

Beyonce’s Reach

The New York Times sent many libraries off on a hunt recently after the debut of Beyonce’s HBO special and announcement that she would release a new album called “Lemonade Stand”. During her special, she read poetry by Somali-British writer and activist Warsan Shire, and now her poetry anthology entitled Teaching My Mother How to Give Birth is being sought out by Beyonce fans.

While it’s not available on Amazon, many libraries are receiving requests for the book (no, we don’t have it at our library, I’m afraid), so be patient if you’ve put a hold on the book. You can heard the author reading some of the poetry right here:

The world is a small place, and book boosts can come from anywhere, can’t they?

View Toronto Through Poetry

The Toronto Public Library, with the help of poet laureate, George Elliott Clarke, has created a new way to explore Toronto: through the use of poetry.

They’ve created a fun, interactive map of Toronto that marks the locations of important spots in poetry about Toronto. At each location on the map, information about the poems is listed, and details as to which branch of the Toronto Public Library has that poetry book available is also given. There are also many Toronto poems that aren’t associated with any specific locations, and you can find out more about those on the Toronto Poetry Map as well.

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