New and Improved!

As bookstores are having to constantly change their formats to keep up with the changing needs of customers, libraries have to do the same. Long gone are the dusty card catalogs, replaced by shiny new tablets with searchable catalogs.

And what about cramped, outdated computers to do your work or log onto social media? Sleek desks with tiny computer footprints make it easier for patrons to get their work–or surfing–done. That even includes a height-adjustable desk for patrons who might be in a wheelchair.

And for older patrons, the task of looking for large print books can be unappealing. But large print covers are now bright and fun, and facing them out bookstore style, should help make selections easier. Maybe patrons will even find some new favourite authors!

If you’re seeing changes at our library, while they might cause a bit of confusion, they’re also exciting and forward-thinking. Take a few minutes to see what’s new at our library!

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Saving

Libraries are all about cost savings. You can get the obvious benefits for your piggy bank by coming here for books instead of buying them. But what else can you get for your money at libraries?

At the Carleton Place Public Library, you can get:

  • movies for the weekend
  • museum passes to take the family to see a special exhibit
  • a great choice of puzzles to take home and exchange for new ones once you finish
  • literacy tutoring for your child who might be struggling with reading
  • access to free WiFi and computers
  • a safe space for your child to meet with a tutor
  • a cool zone during the hot summer months, and a place to warm up in the winter
  • one-on-one tech tutoring for that new device you don’t quite know how to use
  • fun summer programs for the whole family
  • great monthly events like bird watching classes, meditation seminars, and book launches
  • writing classes for youth and adults
  • online language instruction, downloadable magazines, and streaming TV shows
  • access to books from all across the country
  • a family friendly washroom with a changing table
  • room rental space for events
  • Halloween costume exchanges, craft nights, and Lego Drop In days

This is only a fraction of things that you can do or access at our library, but there are many more things that happen at libraries. If you haven’t been to a public library in a while, drop by to see what they offer. You might be surprised!

So, start saving those loonies and toonies for a nice vacation, and visit your public library!

#FairEbookPrices

You may be one of our library users who reads eBooks on OverDrive. Libraries are big promoters of reading, both regular books and eBooks, but it’s becoming more and more difficult to provide readers with enough new eBooks to satisfy the demand. Why? Libraries are charged 3-5 times more for eBooks than regular consumers, simply because publishers believe that we have a larger usage of these books than the average consumer. Is that fair? Libraries don’t think so, and neither should you.

Ce49kP_W8AQtQTzRecently, several key members of the Toronto Public Library, Ottawa Public Library, and Edmonton Public Library held a Twitter Chat to discuss this unfair pricing model, and then posted the chat on Storify.

It’s an interesting read, resulting in a few really good points:

  • even if you don’t read eBooks, this tough pricing model affects your library’s budget for buying other materials
  • this type of overpricing is unsustainable, even for libraries belonging to a consortia that allows us to stretch our budgets further
  • Independent eBook publishers have been leaders in providing reasonable pricing for libraries, but big publishers are still waging war
  • municipal governments are now joining in the fight to help libraries, but more needs to be done, especially if your local government isn’t aware of the problem

Yes, it’s true that publishers and authors need to be paid for the license just as they would for a hard copy book. Libraries can’t afford to purchase 26 copies of one book, and yet eBooks can be distributed repeatedly, giving the impression that publishers are not being paid for the number of people reading. It is simply not true.

Yes, libraries are charged more for lending fees for a book, but consider that libraries will often purchase an eBook, an audiobook, and regular print copy and a large print copy of ONE book.  And they do this multiple times. Therefore, the author and publisher are being paid for these sales, which might be more than they would have sold without a library purchase. Sometimes, libraries purchase books that are not even read. In the end, we hope it all evens out…both for us, our patrons, and the publishers.

Click on the photo above, or the link, to read the whole Twitter chat (start at the top and work through to the bottom if you’re not used to this type of format). And to find out more about eBook pricing, visit fairpricingforlibraries.org. 

What do you think about this issue?

Librarian Problems

tumblr_inline_n3sjlzuk2J1rpcnpzYes, we have some of these problems. Staples are a real thing for us.

*Please note, that while this Tumblr site is VERY funny, it is also aimed at adults and might contain content that is not appropriate for all viewers.

 

WHEN THE PRINTERS STOP WORKING DURING A WEEKEND SHIFT:

tumblr_n9xytmzIrE1qa390yo1_500My favourite…..

Librarian Problems.

 

The Library is Everywhere

everywhere

(This article was originally posted on Feb. 26, 2014, but October is Canadian Library Month, and we wanted to remind people why the library is so important.)

Your library is changing. It might be the same building and the same people and have the same name, but the idea of “library” is completely different now. It’s not only a place to find books, and get information and attend programs. It’s so much more. The library is everything now…and the library is everywhere.

Who is the library?

Your library staff may not have changed much through the years, or it may be in constant flux. At our library, we’re beginning a new chapter, and it’s full of interesting ideas, people and ventures. But the library is not only its staff. The library is community partners, schools, local government, and most importantly, YOU. Without you, there wouldn’t be a need for the building, the books or the staff. So, we must always keep our patrons at the forefront when thinking about the library. We have to listen to what you want and try to anticipate what you might need. I think we do pretty well overall. The library is all of us.

What is the library?

Originally, the library was a place that housed books and stored information. It was a center of learning, a meeting place and a place to gather important records for posterity. The library was history, current events and imagination all in one. And it still is all of those things, but now it’s also much more.

  • The library is a place to get books, magazines, audiobooks, ebooks, movies and music.
  • The library is a place to access computers, usually for free. This not only means access to the internet, but an opportunity to use software to update your resume, search for your ancestors, do your homework or balance your chequebook.
  • The library is a place to bring your wireless devices and access free Wi-Fi. Download movies, chat on Facebook with your friends or check your email.
  • The library is a place to socialize. It’s warm in the winter, and cool in the summer. We have lots of programs where we invite you to come and spend time learning and meeting new people.
  • The library is a place for programs. Babies, toddlers, pre-school, school age, tweens, teens, adults and seniors are all represented at the library.  Looking for something different to do? Chances are, the library is offering up something fun!
  • The library is a community space. Host a meeting, tutor some students, hold a birthday party or teach a class. You can do it all in our public meeting space.
  • The library can help you with your future. Talk with people in a second language, take a course, research Universities, find books on subjects you’d like to know more about.
  • The library can teach you about your past. Access Ancestry.com and research your family tree. Book time in the Genealogy room or talk with a resident expert on the subject. No idea where to start? We have a questionnaire to help, and we offer special one-on-one sessions to learn how to do it, based on the demand.
  • The library is a place to go for help. We’re great at finding local information, matching people up with the correct community service and helping you figure out things like what day to put the trash out. We’re as good at finding your next great read as we are at listening to you vent about lack of parking in the public lot. And hopefully, you’ll always find us to be friendly, interested and full of great ideas.
  • The library is literacy.  Spend time in our Summer Reading program. Find a tutor to help with a second language. Start your children on the right path by coming to babytime or storytime. Read with your family.
  • The library is entertainment! Attend a fun event during the summer. Take part in one of our children’s programs throughout the year. Stock up on DVDs to get through the long weekend. Take out an armload of books.
  • The library supports local business. Did you know we buy some of our book selection from the local bookstore? How about those DVD’s we picked up in another shop in town. Participate in one of our fun events during the Bridge Street Bazaar or during Canada Day and you’ll find us encouraging you to visit many local businesses to see what they have to offer. Like us on Facebook…we have friends in the community, and you’ll find out what’s opening up or staging a special event. The library is everywhere.

Where is the library?

It might seem like an obvious question, but the library isn’t just that building in the center of town. The library is everywhere. It’s in your schools (with presentations and book visits), and it’s in your home (our online catalog is easy to access, and we have eBook and audiobook downloads, too). It’s in your car (plug in a CD or hook up your iPod or tablet to listen to a book on that long drive in), and it’s with you on vacation (bring sale books, stock up on downloads, pick up a movie before you go or access your account from the top of a mountain). Easiest of all, it’s on your phone (just download the OverDrive app, like us on Facebook, scan one of our QR codes and watch a book trailer, or send us a quick email…it’s all at your fingertips!)

When is the library?

Remember when you had to wait for the doors to open to access the library? Now, you can use the library 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Download books in your pajamas when you can’t sleep. Renew your books after we close in the evenings online. Visit our online catalog and place holds on books before you come in so they’re ready for you to pick up when you’re ready. The library is there during holidays, over the summer and most of all, on your schedule. While the physical doors might be locked, there are so many ways to access the library at all hours, you never need to go without information or books. Have a question about a library program or service? Need to know something about the community? Send us a message on Facebook or through the blog. We’re always checking our posts, and we’ll get back to you as quickly as we can. Have an overdue book and can’t find your PIN? Give us a call and leave a message. We’ll renew it the next business day, no problem.

Why is the library?

We should probably rephrase the question to be “Why is the library still so relevant?” It’s not the intimidating place you once visited as a kid, where you had to tiptoe around.  It’s not somewhere you have to go, but someplace you want to go. What other place in your community allows people from all walks of life, from infants to senior citizens, to go through the doors….for free……and participate in something interesting or fun or important? We’re hard-pressed to think of one.

Often, you’ll drop in an hear laughter pouring out of the children’s area, or people in hot discussion at the back tables. You might partake in a conversation with other patrons or staff at the front desk, or engage someone in the parking lot. Why is the library still a part of our society when everything can be accessed online? The easy answer is because the library is still about people. It’s about active conversation and ideas and programs. It’s about a physical building with community ties to engage you in something new. It’s about learning and trying new things. It’s about books and movies. It’s about access for people who might not have access anywhere else. It’s about the people that can afford programs, and the people that can’t. It’s about everyone, regardless of the job you have, where you live, your age or your beliefs. It’s a solid post in your community with access to the world.

How is the library?

This is one question that has to be answered in different ways. How is the library still available? How do we all have access to the library? How can we keep it going? In our community, we don’t charge fees to use the library (except for book fines, photocopies, room rentals and computer printouts). Our library is funded through community taxes, so in effect, if you live in our community, you fund the library. There are also other surrounding communities who help support our library, to ensure their residents also have access. We feel incredibly lucky to have a strong support system behind us, and we don’t take it for granted.  But it’s not the same everywhere.

We can keep libraries open and running by visiting them, taking part in programs, donating to special events or fundraising efforts and accessing us online. Some of our patrons rarely come through our doors, but are active members by downloading eBooks or audiobooks, which also contributes to our statistics. We keep close ties with community groups and encourage them to visit our library…like the Sparks or Cub Scouts. We invite schools to bring classes so that they have access to a bigger selection of books, and in doing so, encourage a new generation of readers. And we stay fresh in the minds of our local government by participating and inviting them to use our facility whenever possible. It’s all about ties….to people, government and ideas.

The next time you hear someone say that libraries are becoming obsolete, think of all of the ways we use our libraries now, and how we could continue to use them in the future. They won’t disappear if we fight for them and make them an integral part of our communities. After all, the library is everywhere.

 Update: Oct. 1, 2015

 It’s been over a year since we posted this originally, and you may have noticed several new changes in the Carleton Place Public Library. We have new staff, new programs that now include adults, new catalog access that allows us to email our patrons reminder notices of items due soon, and new participation in community events. We’re also gearing up for an exciting new element that will change how we do things currently at the front desk…and we think you’re going to LOVE it!

Celebrate Canadian Library Month with us by letting us know what you love about your library. It will always be a vital part of the community, and we hope you think so, too.

 

(Photo: Monika Majkowska)

Summer Reading Help

summer tutorIf you have a young reader in Kindergarten in our community, you might be one of the lucky ones to take part in our first summer of the Lanark Literacy Tutoring Program. All of the surrounding libraries in Lanark County are running some sort of literacy tutoring program throughout the summer (some even run them all school year long as well), so we are excited to jump into the mix.

Over the last month, our literacy tutor, Erica, has taken extensive training to help prepare her for the young people she’ll be working with this summer. She’s put together an exciting and encouraging program for these students who need a little coaching to keep their literacy skills strong over the summer months.

If your family was contacted by your school regarding this program and you filled in the registration papers, Erica will be contacting you over the next few days to arrange your child’s tutoring session this summer. It will be a two-week session, an hour each day, with some fun “homework” to help support your child in his or her reading efforts.

As well, each child will be participating in our TD Summer Reading Club program at the library (although in a slightly different way), so we’re hopeful they’ll have fun, learn some skills…and take home some extras from the library this summer.

Just a reminder, there will be a Parent Information Session on Monday, June 29th from 6-7pm at the Carleton Place Public Library. Parents will receive the starter kit, sign some important forms, and will be able to pay the $15 fee for supplies (fees will be waived if necessary). Please plan to attend. If you can’t make it, please let us know so that we can provide an alternate plan to get your child started with summer reading.

Bookstores.

readsWe have a wonderful local independent bookstore called Read’s Book Shop. On any given day, they have fun drop-in clubs (knitting, book clubs etc), delicious treats and homemade soups at their counter, cute gift items and of course, lots of wonderful books for purchase. I’d like to think this is a bookstore that will continue to go the distance, but we all need to make it work.

Like the future of libraries, bookstores depend on people coming in and purchasing books and other items. They need to remain vital parts of our main streets, and have programs running that will bring in shoppers as well as readers. They also need to be able to provide friendly staff, quick turnaround for book requests, and incentives to get customers to come back. Read’s does this and much more, very similar to a library’s goals, I think.

Did you know that our library and Read’s Book Shop work together at times? You might think we’d be on opposite sides, but we’re not! Our library tries to use the local bookstore for small book orders we might need on a quick turnaround, we encourage people to shop there if they’re looking for something we might not carry at the moment, and we also try to participate in programs they support, such as Free Comic Book Day. In return, they offer us fantastic support, whether it’s through program advertisement, inclusion in special book fairs, and even spontaneous author visits!

Libraries and book stores should do more of this. We are important to each other in different ways, and especially in small communities, vital to the survival of books in our town. Make sure you visit both….your public library and your local book shop. Without you, we might not be around forever.