Summer Reading Help

summer tutorIf you have a young reader in Kindergarten in our community, you might be one of the lucky ones to take part in our first summer of the Lanark Literacy Tutoring Program. All of the surrounding libraries in Lanark County are running some sort of literacy tutoring program throughout the summer (some even run them all school year long as well), so we are excited to jump into the mix.

Over the last month, our literacy tutor, Erica, has taken extensive training to help prepare her for the young people she’ll be working with this summer. She’s put together an exciting and encouraging program for these students who need a little coaching to keep their literacy skills strong over the summer months.

If your family was contacted by your school regarding this program and you filled in the registration papers, Erica will be contacting you over the next few days to arrange your child’s tutoring session this summer. It will be a two-week session, an hour each day, with some fun “homework” to help support your child in his or her reading efforts.

As well, each child will be participating in our TD Summer Reading Club program at the library (although in a slightly different way), so we’re hopeful they’ll have fun, learn some skills…and take home some extras from the library this summer.

Just a reminder, there will be a Parent Information Session on Monday, June 29th from 6-7pm at the Carleton Place Public Library. Parents will receive the starter kit, sign some important forms, and will be able to pay the $15 fee for supplies (fees will be waived if necessary). Please plan to attend. If you can’t make it, please let us know so that we can provide an alternate plan to get your child started with summer reading.

Bookstores.

readsWe have a wonderful local independent bookstore called Read’s Book Shop. On any given day, they have fun drop-in clubs (knitting, book clubs etc), delicious treats and homemade soups at their counter, cute gift items and of course, lots of wonderful books for purchase. I’d like to think this is a bookstore that will continue to go the distance, but we all need to make it work.

Like the future of libraries, bookstores depend on people coming in and purchasing books and other items. They need to remain vital parts of our main streets, and have programs running that will bring in shoppers as well as readers. They also need to be able to provide friendly staff, quick turnaround for book requests, and incentives to get customers to come back. Read’s does this and much more, very similar to a library’s goals, I think.

Did you know that our library and Read’s Book Shop work together at times? You might think we’d be on opposite sides, but we’re not! Our library tries to use the local bookstore for small book orders we might need on a quick turnaround, we encourage people to shop there if they’re looking for something we might not carry at the moment, and we also try to participate in programs they support, such as Free Comic Book Day. In return, they offer us fantastic support, whether it’s through program advertisement, inclusion in special book fairs, and even spontaneous author visits!

Libraries and book stores should do more of this. We are important to each other in different ways, and especially in small communities, vital to the survival of books in our town. Make sure you visit both….your public library and your local book shop. Without you, we might not be around forever.

March 2015 at the Library

Photo by Danist Soh, courtesy of UNSPLASHMarch is here and whether it comes in like a lamb or a lion, we have plenty of great things going on at the library. After the cold stretch in February,  please remember that the library is a warm spot to visit, especially if you are in need of some shelter. We’re open Monday to Thursday 1:30 – 8pm, Friday from 9:30 – 5:30pm, and Saturdays from 10am until 5pm. Drop by during those hours and find a cozy spot to sit. We’d love to see you here!

If you’re looking for things to do this month, we have lots going on. We’re well into our new Toddler Time sessions on Thursday mornings at 10am, and we also run a regular storytime on Wednesday mornings, either 9:30am or 10:15am. Please call the library for more information and to register.

Forest of Reading continues this month, and our young readers are really racing through their books!  We have several readers who have completed their category, and have moved on to another. Who will read 30 books this time? It’s up for grabs!

Of course, the BIG thing happening this month is March Break, which takes place from March 16 – 20. We’ll have all kinds of fun events for the little ones, school age, teen and even a few things for adults! Please see our earlier post for the complete schedule, or drop by the library to pick one up. We’re going to be busy!

As usual, we’ll be having our monthly Craft Club meeting on Monday, March 16th from 6-7:30pm. This is a great session for adults who like to knit, crochet, or do any number of crafts. Bring along your work, and plan on meeting up with new people who also like to craft. Refreshments provided!

Have you taken advantage of our Ancestry Database training? If you haven’t, there are still slots available for anyone who wishes to know a little bit more about how to use the service and start researching your family tree. These are one-on-one sessions, and you do need to have some computer skills in order to get started. Call us to make an appointment!

To finish up this month, we’re getting ready to write books again in April. Join us on Tuesday, March 31st for the Camp NaNoWriMo Kick-Off Party!  We’ll talk about NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month), discuss our plans for the month of April, and give writers a few pointers to begin writing. If you’ve been taking part in our sessions which began last year, this is a fun event, and one that gets our creative juices flowing. If you haven’t been writing, but think you might have a novel in you, join us from 6-7pm to find out how we can help you write that novel in April.

We hope to see you this month. Happy March!

Welcome Back!

welcomeDuring the March Break, we’re doing something special….welcoming people BACK to the library! We realize that sometimes fines can be intimidating. Really, we just want our books back so that other patrons can use them, too. But we understand that it might be difficult to pay a fine that has grown quite large.

Come back to the library during the March Break (March 16 – 21), bring your LONG overdue items back (movies, books, magazines), and we’ll wipe the fines clean. (And we promise, we won’t scold you!). Are other large fines preventing you from coming in? We don’t want you to feel like you can’t use all of the fantastic resources the library has to offer, so bring us a few donations for our local food bank (non-perishables or money), and we’ll wipe those fines away, too!  It’s a win-win situation……we get our items back, and you can start using the library again!

If you have any questions, please give us a call at 257-2702 for more information.

We want you back at the library! Drop in and say hello!

Be Thankful, Day 3

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Today is all about being thankful for your local library. Many smaller towns and even big cities are losing their libraries due to lack of funding. Libraries are such important places these days, for so many reasons, and we should do all we can to keep them in our communities.

No longer is the library “just” a place to get a book. Libraries are now information hubs for the community, convenient meeting spots, afterschool tutoring locations, maker spaces, digital go-to sources, wi-fi zones, community resource centres and so much more. You can get books, take a course, make some crafts, listen to stories, prepare and send out resumes, surf the web, play a game, research your family history, learn how to download ebooks and audiobooks on your device, and find out if you’re on the voting list for the upcoming election. If we didn’t have libraries as a central part of the community, where would people go? In this age of information, we’re less connected than ever before, so keeping libraries as a free zone to meet up with other community members, develop friendships that go beyond the library walls, and learn about community resources in a safe and welcoming environment is essential to the workings of a happy and healthy society.

Today, thank your local library. Make a donation. Drop in and say hello. Take part in a project or event. Stop by and see what’s happening. If you haven’t been in a while, you might be surprised at what is being offered!

Weeding a Collection

Our very own Head of Library Services, Meriah Caswell, wrote a fascinating article in our local arts arts newspaper ‘The Humm”, called “Your Books, Your Library,Your Community”. It was all about how difficult ( and controversial) it can be to keep a library collection up to date and complete. While many people think of discarding books as the ultimate sin, it’s a necessary evil for libraries that can’t expand their buildings to keep everything. Meriah explains:

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“Developing a library collection, is not all about finding the perfect book for its reader. There is a darker side to librarianship. The side we don’t like to talk about. The thing is, once a library has filled its shelves with all those wonderful books, soon those shelves cannot be packed any further. White pages begin to yellow, hot topics become yesterday’s news, and current information turns from dated to incorrect and, if kept long enough, to hilariously (or insultingly) outmoded (for examples of this, check out awfullibrarybooks.net).

People who have read the hottest title are loathe to read it again, and soon the book featuring a busty damsel with hot pants and a scrunchie on the cover has been sitting on the shelf for years without a reader. These books must be moved in order to make room for those that the community currently wants to read. The process of finding these books and separating them from the ones that are in demand has been euphemistically dubbed “weeding”, and is an important part of keeping a collection current and relevant to a community. Library staff will rely on a variety of methods to determine what should be pulled, with circulation statistics being the main indicator. Books that are “weeded” often find new life on the “for sale” table, and many libraries will donate their used items to charitable organizations.

At the Carleton Place Public Library, much of our weeded material is donated to Better World Books, who will match each online book sale with a donation of a book to someone in need.”

 

So, the next time you come to the library and look through our sale table, keep in mind that these books were once well loved, and will hopefully serve a new purpose to someone who might not have had a chance to read them yet.