Are you Anticipating?

underI was slow to pick up Patrick deWitt’s award winning THE SISTERS BROTHERS, but loved it. Witt’s story was everything I thought as Western wouldn’t be–funny, full of endearing characters, and enlightening.

So, when I saw that his newest book UNDERMAJORDOMO MINOR is coming out this fall, I immediately put in on my to-be-read list. Points for weirdest title ever aside, this book is billed as a fable without a moral about a man named Lucy who becomes the Undermajordomo of the Castle von Aux. With adventure, a mystery, and a double murder,  I expect it to be as surprising as the last. deWitt will probably earn some more awards for his skillful writing, and creative characters, so if you haven’t read anything by this Canadian author, put this on hold now, or pick up THE SISTERS BROTHERS.  You won’t be disappointed.

The Clan is Back!

Jean Auel’s CLAN OF THE CAVE BEAR series has always been popular in our library. Back in the mid-eighties, they made a movie out of the first book, starring then-popular Daryl Hannah, and it didn’t garner much positive feedback. They’re trying again.

This time, Auel’s story is being made into a Lifetime series, with Ron Howard and Brian Grazer behind it. Bigger names + better producers will hopefully mean the story gets told with more devotion to the characters and story Auel’s fans have grown to love.

CLAN OF THE CAVE BEAR by Jean AuelTHE CLAN OF THE CAVE BEAR takes place 25,000 years ago and centres around a clan of Neanderthals who take into their group an orphan Cro-Magnon girl named Ayla. It focuses on the story of Ayla growing up in a society not the same as her own, and how she breaks free of the issues placed upon Neanderthal women. Gripping, right?

Auel weaves history and fiction together into a tale that explains the differences in early man, and also shows how much we haven’t changed. Auel did research at her local library, by touring archeological sites, and by going to numerous archeological conventions according to some online bios. We’ll have to wait to see if this television series makes fans happy.

How To Finish a Book

safe_image.phpNeil Gaiman, author extraordinaire, gives some advice to a fan who would also like to write a book, but is having trouble getting things down on paper. I thought this was appropriate, consider we’ve had so many writers working on books in our library this past year. If only they’d known this before!

Write the ideas down. If they are going to be stories, try and tell the stories you would like to read. Finish the things you start to write. Do it a lot and you will be a writer. The only way to do it is to do it.

I’m just kidding. There are much easier ways of doing it.

 

To find out the easier way of doing things, click this link to visit the article on his Tumblr page.

What did you think of his advice? Frankly, it’s brilliant.

Very Good Lives

Earlier this week, Little, Brown Book Group announced they would be publishing an illustrated version of J. K. Rowling’s 2008 speech during a Harvard University commencement where she talked about the benefits of failure.

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Sales from the book, called VERY GOOD LIVES, will benefit Rowling’s charity called Lumos which aims to transform the lives of disadvantaged children. Similarly, it will also go toward providing financial aid to students at Harvard.

You can watch the original speech here, claimed by many to be one of the most memorable speeches in Harvard history. The book is bound to be just as riveting!

Author Visit!

Next week, the Carleton Place Public Library is pleased to welcome the author of IF…A MIND-BENDING NEW WAY OF LOOKING AT BIG IDEAS AND NUMBERS, David J. Smith!  While he won’t be speaking at the library, he’ll be joining us at St. Mary’s Catholic School to visit with the students there. If you aren’t aware, we have class visits from St. Mary’s students quite regularly here at the library, and we thought this visit would be a nice way to reward them for coming and using the library. It’s going to be a fun visit!

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Mr. Smith will arrive here in Carleton Place next Tuesday, November 4th, and we’ll whisk him over the St. Mary’s where he’ll talk about his latest book, as well as some of his other great non-fiction for young people.  He is a teacher with more than 25 years experience in a classroom setting, and his books show that he’s well aware of the difficulties in teaching young people about size and comparison.  This should be a really fun talk, and we’re hoping he’ll be able to sign a few books while he’s here. We have his collection available here in the library, and we encourage anyone who might want to purchase one of his books to drop by our local bookstore, Reads Book Shop, and order a copy. If you have a young person aged 8-12 at home, it’s a great book to consider.

We’re looking forward to next week!

Be Thankful, Day 1

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Thanksgiving is just ahead for all of us Canadians, and while many of us are thinking about pumpkin pie and turkey dinners that will burst all our zippers, I’m hoping to take a few days to help put you in the “Be Thankful” mode. It doesn’t just include the person making the big meal, or the people coming to your home for the long weekend. Why not say thank you to a few different people?

Today, we should say thank you to the authors who write the books we love. They spend long months or years toiling away on the stories that stay in our hearts, make us laugh or make us weep, and yet, after we finish a book, we rarely think about the person who created the world we immersed ourselves in for that short time. Most authors out there have Facebook pages, Twitter accounts, websites and even Instagram accounts where you can stop by and say thanks. Maybe you’ll post a photo of yourself reading that amazing book they just wrote. (Don’t forget to tag them in the photo!) Or maybe you have time to send off a quick email to say how much their work means to you.  Whatever you do, today is the day.

Take a few minutes to thank an author!

Paying it Forward

Author Eleanor Catton, winner of the Man Booker Prize in 2013 for THE LUMINARIES, announced recently while accepting a prize for the New Zealand Post, that she intends to establish a grant that will award writers $3000  to provide “time to read”. 

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There will be no strings attached, except that the author will have to write a short non-fiction article to be published at the end of the three-month period, stating what they read and what they learned from each book. She hopes it will help others understand the need for authors to have time to read, as well as to write, simply because a well-read author will write stronger works as a result.