Frivolous Friday at the Library

This week, our Frivolous Friday post means a lot to a couple of us here at the Carleton Place Public Library. And it’s all because of a wonderful library patron and her husband.

After striking up conversations on Tuesday nights with a lovely patron, Veronica, about our favourite TV show, Coronation Street, we had a bit of a surprise. While Veronica’s husband made the odd trip to England for work, he’d bring her back newspapers with articles about the cast of Corrie. And after reading them, Veronica would pop into the library and generously share the papers with two other enormous Corrie fans….Judi and myself. After a good chat, we’d often talk about what it must be like to visit the set on one of the famous Corrie tours, and then we’d wait for our next Tuesday night chat.

Recently, as a surprise birthday gift, Veronica’s husband treated her to a special gift…..a trip across the pond to visit her favourite show and see the set. But not only did they do that, they took along a special banner….and took photos at all the famous Corrie haunts:

20150519_195218Thank you, Veronica and Jim, for the amazing banner, the Corrie mugs and backstage passes, and just for the general amazingness that you would do this for us. You are truly generous people, and we can’t thank you enough!

Now it’s time for a cuppa…….

Who Edits?

PaperTowns2009_6ATheTeen Book Club at our library (aka The Nerd Herd) read and discussed John Green’s PAPER TOWNS. In it, a character obsessively edits a fictional online resource very similar to Wikipedia. His complusiveness is a funny part of this book, but it seems that real life has taken a page from John Green.

Recently, at a presentation regarding Wikipedia and its users, employees were asked who actually edits this site?  If you’ve ever used Wikipedia, you’ll know that it is full of great information—some true and some not—most of which is contributed through user content alone. That means someone out there who knows a lot about a subject has taken the time to add his or her knowledge to the site regarding that topic. Is it always correct? No. Which is why many schools ban the use of Wikipedia when their students are doing research.

But for the most part, the content is probably pretty strong. However, the Wikipedia people set out after this presentation to find out exactly who was editing their site. And they came up with some very interesting facts. First, they conducted interviews with people who regularly contribute to or edit the site. They learned that a lot of these people were happy to work on a variety of subjects—whatever pleased them at the moment. Others were more specific and moved in one direction….like a user named Giraffedata, who had more than 15,000 edits to his credit…all for the same incorrect use of the term “comprised of” in articles. The Wiki people were VERY interested in Giraffedata, almost a God to some of them in the world of edits. So, they set out to find the person behind the screen name in hopes of honoring him with their own version of the Oscar in the Wiki editing world…a Barnstar.

And it turns out, Giraffedata is a 51-year-old software engineer names Bryan Henderson who has contributed more than 47,000 edits since 2007. And most of them are simply that one correction…..”comprised of”, which he replaces with “composed of” in proper form. He goes through articles systematically, week by week, and makes the change, determined to rid the world of his singular pet peeve. He even wrote a piece of software to help him find the newest additions to Wikipedia, and does his corrections each Sunday night. It won’t change the world, but in his own way, he’s making a mark in a unique way.

You can read more about Mr. Henderson and his quirky connection to Wikipedia right here. The article is full of pie charts, photos, and fascinating information not only about why Henderson does what he does, but how it impacts what you read. And if you are interested in making your own changes or additions to the information website, you can find out how to do it…well, on Wikipedia! It’s an arduous process, but once you learn how to do it, you’ve got a new skill. Give it a try!

Scratch-Off

Last summer, our adult readers had a lot of fun with our “Goodies for Grown Ups” adult summer reading tickets. After joining the program and reading books, they were given special scratch-off tickets to win prizes that were donated by several local businesses. It was a big hit!

scratchoffmap2So, when I came across this Scratch-Off World Map, it reminded me of our program. The “I Was Here” map is a unique item designed by the Art. Lebedev Studio Shop to help travelers keep track of places they’ve been. It begins as a large, grey world map, but once you visit a place, you scratch off the country and the colour is revealed underneath. How is that for incentive to get visiting the world?

This gives me ideas for our upcoming summer program…..

What Would You Do With That Object?

Artist Christophe Niemann calls himself a visual storyteller. He takes everyday objects and translates them into something fresh. Each simple piece tells a story without ever using a word. What do those scissors look like to you except a pair of scissors? To Niemann, they become a sophisticated woman with her legs crossed, reading the newspaper.

Niemann is one of many artists to use Instagram as  a medium to share his art, and I must admit, he is someone I’ve been following for quite some time. His ideas are whimsical and always interesting, and they add a touch of joy to the everyday.

bearHow about this wonderful paper cup bear? And this was just a simple photo taken mid-flight somewhere.  You can find out more about his work on his website here.

The next time you pick up a paper clip, or a hairbrush, I bet you’ll look at it in a brand new way. How can you tell a story today in a new way?

 

 

Dads and Babies

babytimefacebookHey Dad….stay home with your baby today!

Okay, this isn’t an official holiday or anything, but we do have a lot of dads that come with their little ones to babytime and storytime. And it’s refreshing to see such hands-on dads!

While some dads are really lucky, the Swedish government recognizes how hard it is for fathers to spend these precious and important early years with their children. Not only do they have a very generous maternity leave in Sweden (480 days), at least 60 of these days MUST be taken by the father, or are lost altogether. Isn’t that amazing?

Photographer Johan Bävman has begun a photo series he calls Swedish Dads, showing just what it is like for these fathers who are tasked with taking care of their little ones. So far, he’s documented thirty dads, but is aiming for sixty, to have one for each of the paternity leave days. Drop by his website here to see some fantastic funny, heartwarming, and beautiful pictures of dads and their children in this series. You can also read about each of their stories. I guarantee this will make your Monday better!

Green Eggs and Ham…on Netflix?

green

It sounds like a joke, but the people at Netflix have announced they are adapting the classic GREEN EGGS AND HAM into a 13-part animated series. Executive producer Ellen DeGeneres and the people at Netflix released this official media report:

Issued from Netflix headquarters.
Delivered straight to all reporters.

We’d love to share some happy news
based on the rhymes of Dr. Seuss.
Green Eggs and Ham will become a show
and you’re among the first to know.

In this richly animated production,
a 13-episode introduction,
standoffish inventor (Guy, by name)
and Sam-I-Am of worldwide fame,
embark on a cross-country trip
that tests the limits of their friendship.
As they learn to try new things,
they find out what adventure brings.
Of course they also get to eat
that famous green and tasty treat!

You can hear more about it from Ellen right here:

http://ellentube.com/videos/0_gk5rb51d

It sounds like it will be a lot of fun, and will probably be a BIG hit with the younger set.

You can stream it on a phone,

You can stream it on your own………