Electronic Resources at the Library

While many of you are already thinking summer, we’d like to remind you about some of the great eResources we have available on our library website to help with homework, reading and more. There is more here than just an online encyclopedia—how about book suggestions, read-alongs, and more!

To access any of these great eResources, all you need to do is visit our website at:

http://carletonplacelibrary.ca

eResourcesDid you notice how many of these offer French options? And everything is available 24/7! All you need is your library card. Click on one of the links above, and get searching.

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#FairEbookPrices

You may be one of our library users who reads eBooks on OverDrive. Libraries are big promoters of reading, both regular books and eBooks, but it’s becoming more and more difficult to provide readers with enough new eBooks to satisfy the demand. Why? Libraries are charged 3-5 times more for eBooks than regular consumers, simply because publishers believe that we have a larger usage of these books than the average consumer. Is that fair? Libraries don’t think so, and neither should you.

Ce49kP_W8AQtQTzRecently, several key members of the Toronto Public Library, Ottawa Public Library, and Edmonton Public Library held a Twitter Chat to discuss this unfair pricing model, and then posted the chat on Storify.

It’s an interesting read, resulting in a few really good points:

  • even if you don’t read eBooks, this tough pricing model affects your library’s budget for buying other materials
  • this type of overpricing is unsustainable, even for libraries belonging to a consortia that allows us to stretch our budgets further
  • Independent eBook publishers have been leaders in providing reasonable pricing for libraries, but big publishers are still waging war
  • municipal governments are now joining in the fight to help libraries, but more needs to be done, especially if your local government isn’t aware of the problem

Yes, it’s true that publishers and authors need to be paid for the license just as they would for a hard copy book. Libraries can’t afford to purchase 26 copies of one book, and yet eBooks can be distributed repeatedly, giving the impression that publishers are not being paid for the number of people reading. It is simply not true.

Yes, libraries are charged more for lending fees for a book, but consider that libraries will often purchase an eBook, an audiobook, and regular print copy and a large print copy of ONE book.  And they do this multiple times. Therefore, the author and publisher are being paid for these sales, which might be more than they would have sold without a library purchase. Sometimes, libraries purchase books that are not even read. In the end, we hope it all evens out…both for us, our patrons, and the publishers.

Click on the photo above, or the link, to read the whole Twitter chat (start at the top and work through to the bottom if you’re not used to this type of format). And to find out more about eBook pricing, visit fairpricingforlibraries.org. 

What do you think about this issue?

Audiobooks and more

Spring into eBooks 2_404x404Audiobooks and eBooks are always on our minds at the library. You can access the free digital collection from our OverDrive partnership simply by having a library card and PIN number. If you have a tablet, phone, eReader, or computer, there are plenty of ways to download a book and either listen, or read. It’s easy, and you’ll get addicted to it, we promise!

If you use a device that has apps, download the OverDrive app from Google Play, or the App Store, install it and sign up, and all you’ll need now is your library card and PIN.  All of the great books you take out will download right into your app, where you can read offline, or use a browser to access your checkouts. Yes, you can do this from anywhere in the world, at any time–day or night.

Audiobooks are great for people who work out, for those with long commutes, and for people who have a busy lifestyle. Listen on the go and never miss out on that great new book everyone is talking about. Place a hold if it isn’t available right away, and the folks at OverDrive will email you when it becomes available for you. Easy, right?

If you prefer to read instead of listen, eBooks are a favourite of many of our patrons. You can have dozens of books on your device at once, travel and not have to worry about overdue books, and enjoy bonus features to reading, such as virtual bookmarks, syncing to more than one device in the middle of reading, a dictionary, and much more. And it only takes a few seconds to download an eBook. Have you tried it yet?

If you have an older eReader, don’t worry, most of the devices are still supported. You might need to use your computer to facilitate the download, but you can still read with ease on your eReader and not have to worry about lugging around heavy books. Some of the eReaders even come with special features that allow you to read at night, or take away the harmful effects of reading an electronic device before trying to sleep.

If you want to know more about eBooks and Audiobooks on OverDrive, drop by the library for a quick demo, or take home some information to get started. You’ll be reading up a storm before you know it! (Sorry about the storm reference….we’re tired of them, too!)

There’s an app for that…

05BOOKAPP2-master180We’ve all been reading eBooks on our tablets, computers, and phones, but there’s a new option about to hit the market…a book app with extra digital content.

Metabook, a new eBook publishing company, decided to launch a brand new idea…releasing a book through an app instead of as a regular eBook. And to begin, they’ve started with a book written especially for the project by Wally Lamb called, I’LL TAKE YOU THERE, to be released next year.

Instead of making this book available in traditional ways, it will only be available through the app, which people will presumably have to purchase. Then, it will only allow apple users to download the book through iTunes and read it on the Metabook app.  It’s a risky option, but one that an established author such as Wally Lamb can probably afford. However, this isn’t just an eBook…it’s an interactive reading experience.

Along with the book, Lamb has the option of adding digital commentary, playlists, photos and much more to the app to allow readers a multi-media experience like no other. While it might be a new idea, it sounds like something that readers will love once it becomes a little more mainstream.

If you want to read more about Lamb, Metabook, and the app, you can find a great article about it here.

Books vs eBooks

recite-1l27nz1Such a true statement, and yet, people often ask us if we’re seeing a decline in readers of actual books at the library. It’s actually quite a balanced answer: people who read traditional books are often also reading eBooks. If the world had been taken over by eBooks, we would have seen huge evidence of that by now, I think.

However, that being said, there is an interesting statistic that has come up recently regarding people who do download eBooks. It seems that more and more people are purchasing cheap eBooks…and yet, not reading them.

The people at Kobo delved into the statistics last year, and found that 60% of eBooks sold through their company were never even opened. Sixty percent. That’s a lot of books. And the more expensive the book was to begin with, the more likely someone would at least open it. So, are cheap books really benefiting anyone?The trend seems to be on buying these digital books when they’re offered as promotions, but maybe it’s simply the old adage “out of sight, out of mind”, that makes people ignore the books once purchased. They’re not sitting out in plain sight on our shelves as eBooks, and so, tend to be forgotten.

This could be why Amazon’s new plan to pay authors for the number of pages read–instead of for the entire book sold–is bothering a lot of people. If readers are downloading books because they are being offered at a reduced rate…and then not reading them at all, the authors will lose out. Effectively, it looks like Amazon will be the big winner here.

Unless the world and environment deems we cannot physically make books anymore, I think the digital world of reading, and the traditional world will not collide or overrun one another.

Have you ever purchased an eBook and not read it?

Tech Thursdays!

techAre you having trouble figuring out your email? Finding that new tablet confusing? Wanting to learn how to download eBooks or Audiobooks? We can help!

We’re now offering “Tech Thursdays at the Library!” Sign up for a one-on-one session, and we show you the basics, or help you get past that stumbling block. Give us a call to reserve your space with Caroline, starting today!

 

Movies are Taking Over.

According to Time Magazine this week, Netflix accounts for more than 37% of downstream Internet traffic. That means more than a third of the entire internet is being taken up by people watching movies and TV through Netflix. Is the Internet changing?

movie nightAt the library, we are finding parallels. A large portion of our circulation is now movies, as well as eBooks and Audiobook downloads. It doesn’t mean that people aren’t reading, or that they aren’t visiting the library, it just means that they’re doing more from home, and using the library as a source of entertainment, as well as information.

This isn’t bad for libraries, so don’t panic. We aren’t becoming movie stores. It’s just a different way people are accessing things they are interested in, and we’re lucky to be able to provide these items to the public free of charge. If anything, it’s making the library more relevant to our patrons instead of less relevant.

So, what will you be downloading this weekend?