A Book by Any Other Cover…

“I read this book already, but I didn’t recognize it.”

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We’ve heard this on a number of occasions, when someone has taken out a book and then brought it back, only to have already read it. It’s not that they forgot; the cover is different! This happens quite often when books are released in other countries…the covers will often change. And while we don’t usually purchase books in other languages, sometimes we will get copies that have been released in England. Sometimes, even the title changes!

You can see a fun list of identical books (inside the covers, at least) right here at The Millions. Have you read any of these? Have you read any a second time by mistake?

Published in: on March 12, 2014 at 3:23 am  Leave a Comment  
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Book in a Jar

For our special teen event during the March Break, we’re having a “Book in a Jar” contest! There will be three jars in the YA section to look at, each with a certain book inside. Pick one up, figure it out and fill out a ballot. book in a jar

It might be easy, it might be tricky…but it’ll be fun! Maybe you’ll even win a prize!

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Calling All Campers!

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We’re getting ready for something fun in April! Camp NaNoWriMo at the Carleton Place Public Library! It’s Camp for grown-ups! And writers! It’s camp for grown-up writers! And it’s going to be a fun month, filled with lots of writing chit-chat, fun writing prompts to keep you going, lots of support from your friendly librarians and maybe even some snacks. Oh, and of course, you’re going to WRITE!

What’s Camp NaNoWriMo?

November is known as National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo for short. But not everyone finds November to be the best time to get down to serious work, so the great folks who organize the event have come up with two other months during the year to help inspire would-be authors. The first is April, and the next is July. And to make it extra fun, they’ve themed it around the idea of summer camp, complete with cabins and bunk beds! 

If you’ve ever felt the urge to write a novel, this is your chance. During the 30 days of April, your goal is to write 50,000 words. Maybe that sounds like a lot, maybe it doesn’t. It’s actually slightly shorter than your average novel (maybe more like a novella, but let’s not split hairs). It means you need to write about 1666 words every day. Or write all 50,000 the night on April 30th, it’s up to you. Regardless, it’s a great, doable challenge. And when you’re done, you’ll be able to tell everyone you wrote a book!

Why is the library participating?

We’re all about books, of course! And we love to support people and their dreams. Whether you’ve written ten books, or never even attempted one, we’re here to help you out. We can’t tell you what to write, or how you’ll need to manage your time in order to get those 1666 words down each day, but we have lots of great things to help. We have plenty of books on craft, books you can read for inspiration in your desired genre, movies to help you look at plot and character development quickly, or even books to help you choose names for your characters.

The library has free WiFi, and we’re open six days a week, so it’s a good opportunity to get good solid work on your novel done every day. We’ll have a dedicated space open on most days, with lots of plugins for your computers. Of course, you don’t have to use a laptop…you can write the old fashioned way with pen and paper. Whatever feels best.

Who can participate?

Camp NaNoWriMo is open to anyone over the age of 13, and we’re hoping a lot of people in our community and the surrounding areas will take part. It’s easy to register on the Camp NaNo page. Then, drop into the library to pick up your Camp Kit for the rest of the details. We’re hoping to have as many people as possibly in our library cabin, so we’ll ask you for some info when you pick up your kit.

To really get everything going, we’re having a Camp NaNoWriMo Kick-Off on Tuesday, March 25th here at the library from 6 – 7pm. We’ll talk about everything we’re planning, give you some fun things to get your creative juices flowing and then make sure everyone is signed up.

So, if you’ve ever wanted to write a novel, come to the library and join us for Camp during the month of April. Air out those sleeping bags, stock up on sunscreen and make sure your shorts are good to go. We’re writing a novel in April!

Watch a Book Trailer!

We’re having fun at the library! Although it used to be that we didn’t allow cell phone use in the  library, with our online catalog available on our Facebook page, we’re trying to think of new ways to use our phones and tablets. How about watching a book trailer by scanning one of those QR codes? Now you can!

What’s a QR code?  It’s one of those funny looking pixelated squares you see on packages, signs and in magazines.

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All you need is a free QR code reader on your phone and you can scan the square to watch a book trailer. It’s that easy! Now you can do more than just read the inside cover to find out if you’ll like the book…why not watch the trailer to get a better sense? (Not sure what a book trailer is? Often, authors will create a short “movie” to let you get readers excited to buy or read their books. It’s not a real movie, so don’t expect it to show up in theatres, but they’re usually quite good!)

Keep your eye out for these to appear in the library in the next few months. And scan away…

Great New Books!

We are always putting out great new books, but what if you don’t read fiction? Is there anything great out there for those who might not want to get caught up in a mystery or thriller? Of course! Some of the interesting selection we have out in the new bin right now:

TEQUILA MOCKINGBIRD : AND OTHER LITERARY LIBATIONS by Tim Federle

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While Federle is making the rounds as a Middle Grade author (his NATE series about a boy who can’t get enough of musical theatre is bursting off the shelves), this book was recently voted “Cookbook of the Year” on Goodreads. Enjoy a literary classic in a new way!

For Dr. Who fans, there’s the new WHO-OLOGY : DR. WHO, THE OFFICIAL MISCELLANY by Cavan Scott.

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Is there anything this author doesn’t write about? He’s done books on dinosaurs, ghosts, YA scary-as-anything fiction, crazy cartoony books and much more. His website is filled with lots of information for fans, budding authors and more.

NEVER HAVE I EVER : MY LIFE (SO FAR) WITHOUT A DATE by Katie Heaney

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Ms. Heaney’s memoir is the story of her search for love. She’s twenty-five, cute as a button and yet has never had a boyfriend. But don’t feel sorry for her. This is a funny book, full of personality and great anecdotes to make you realize not everyone follows the same path through life. I can think of several people who need to read this book. Several.

And finally, if you’re a closet crochet addict, you might want to pick up GEEK CHIC CROCHET, by Nicki Trench.

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Although we must admit, we had a little chuckle at a few of the so-called “retro-inspired” projects (old-fashioned wouldn’t be a great subtitle, would it?), some are really cute and might make you break out those needles once again.

You can pick up these or many other great non-fiction books at the library. We’re filling up the new bin all the time!

Published in: on March 3, 2014 at 3:14 am  Leave a Comment  
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The Library is Everywhere

everywhere

Your library is changing. It might be the same building and the same people and have the same name, but the idea of “library” is completely different now. It’s not only a place to find books, and get information and attend programs. It’s so much more. The library is everything now…and the library is everywhere.

Who is the library?

Your library staff may not have changed much through the years, or it may be in constant flux. At our library, we’re beginning a new chapter, and it’s full of interesting ideas, people and ventures. But the library is not only its staff. The library is community partners, schools, local government, and most importantly, YOU. Without you, there wouldn’t be a need for the building, the books or the staff. So, we must always keep our patrons at the forefront when thinking about the library. We have to listen to what you want and try to anticipate what you might need. I think we do pretty well overall. The library is all of us.

What is the library?

Originally, the library was a place that housed books and stored information. It was a center of learning, a meeting place and a place to gather important records for posterity. The library was history, current events and imagination all in one. And it still is all of those things, but now it’s also much more.

  • The library is a place to get books, magazines, audiobooks, ebooks, movies and music.
  • The library is a place to access computers, usually for free. This not only means access to the internet, but an opportunity to use software to update your resume, search for your ancestors, do your homework or balance your chequebook.
  • The library is a place to bring your wireless devices and access free Wi-Fi. Download movies, chat on Facebook with your friends or check your email.
  • The library is a place to socialize. It’s warm in the winter, and cool in the summer. We have lots of programs where we invite you to come and spend time learning and meeting new people.
  • The library is a place for programs. Babies, toddlers, pre-school, school age, tweens, teens, adults and seniors are all represented at the library.  Looking for something different to do? Chances are, the library is offering up something fun!
  • The library is a community space. Host a meeting, tutor some students, hold a birthday party or teach a class. You can do it all in our public meeting space.
  • The library can help you with your future. Talk with people in a second language, take a course, research Universities, find books on subjects you’d like to know more about.
  • The library can teach you about your past. Access Ancestry.com and research your family tree. Book time in the Genealogy room or talk with a resident expert on the subject. No idea where to start? We have a questionnaire to help, and we offer special one-on-one sessions to learn how to do it, based on the demand.
  • The library is a place to go for help. We’re great at finding local information, matching people up with the correct community service and helping you figure out things like what day to put the trash out. We’re as good at finding your next great read as we are at listening to you vent about lack of parking in the public lot. And hopefully, you’ll always find us to be friendly, interested and full of great ideas.
  • The library is literacy.  Spend time in our Summer Reading program. Find a tutor to help with a second language. Start your children on the right path by coming to babytime or storytime. Read with your family.
  • The library is entertainment! Attend a fun event during the summer. Take part in one of our children’s programs throughout the year. Stock up on DVDs to get through the long weekend. Take out an armload of books.
  • The library supports local business. Did you know we buy some of our book selection from the local bookstore? How about those DVD’s we picked up in another shop in town. Participate in one of our fun events during the Bridge Street Bazaar or during Canada Day and you’ll find us encouraging you to visit many local businesses to see what they have to offer. Like us on Facebook…we have friends in the community, and you’ll find out what’s opening up or staging a special event. The library is everywhere.

Where is the library?

It might seem like an obvious question, but the library isn’t just that building in the center of town. The library is everywhere. It’s in your schools (with presentations and book visits), and it’s in your home (our online catalog is easy to access, and we have eBook and audiobook downloads, too). It’s in your car (plug in a CD or hook up your iPod or tablet to listen to a book on that long drive in), and it’s with you on vacation (bring sale books, stock up on downloads, pick up a movie before you go or access your account from the top of a mountain). Easiest of all, it’s on your phone (just download the OverDrive app, like us on Facebook, scan one of our QR codes and watch a book trailer, or send us a quick email…it’s all at your fingertips!)

When is the library?

Remember when you had to wait for the doors to open to access the library? Now, you can use the library 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Download books in your pajamas when you can’t sleep. Renew your books after we close in the evenings online. Visit our online catalog and place holds on books before you come in so they’re ready for you to pick up when you’re ready. The library is there during holidays, over the summer and most of all, on your schedule. While the physical doors might be locked, there are so many ways to access the library at all hours, you never need to go without information or books. Have a question about a library program or service? Need to know something about the community? Send us a message on Facebook or through the blog. We’re always checking our posts, and we’ll get back to you as quickly as we can. Have an overdue book and can’t find your PIN? Give us a call and leave a message. We’ll renew it the next business day, no problem.

Why is the library?

We should probably rephrase the question to be “Why is the library still so relevant?” It’s not the intimidating place you once visited as a kid, where you had to tiptoe around.  It’s not somewhere you have to go, but someplace you want to go. What other place in your community allows people from all walks of life, from infants to senior citizens, to go through the doors….for free……and participate in something interesting or fun or important? We’re hard-pressed to think of one.

Often, you’ll drop in an hear laughter pouring out of the children’s area, or people in hot discussion at the back tables. You might partake in a conversation with other patrons or staff at the front desk, or engage someone in the parking lot. Why is the library still a part of our society when everything can be accessed online? The easy answer is because the library is still about people. It’s about active conversation and ideas and programs. It’s about a physical building with community ties to engage you in something new. It’s about learning and trying new things. It’s about books and movies. It’s about access for people who might not have access anywhere else. It’s about the people that can afford programs, and the people that can’t. It’s about everyone, regardless of the job you have, where you live, your age or your beliefs. It’s a solid post in your community with access to the world.

How is the library?

This is one question that has to be answered in different ways. How is the library still available? How do we all have access to the library? How can we keep it going? In our community, we don’t charge fees to use the library (except for book fines, photocopies, room rentals and computer printouts). Our library is funded through community taxes, so in effect, if you live in our community, you fund the library. There are also other surrounding communities who help support our library, to ensure their residents also have access. We feel incredibly lucky to have a strong support system behind us, and we don’t take it for granted.  But it’s not the same everywhere.

We can keep libraries open and running by visiting them, taking part in programs, donating to special events or fundraising efforts and accessing us online. Some of our patrons rarely come through our doors, but are active members by downloading eBooks or audiobooks, which also contributes to our statistics. We keep close ties with community groups and encourage them to visit our library…like the Sparks or Cub Scouts. We invite schools to bring classes so that they have access to a bigger selection of books, and in doing so, encourage a new generation of readers. And we stay fresh in the minds of our local government by participating and inviting them to use our facility whenever possible. It’s all about ties….to people, government and ideas.

The next time you hear someone say that libraries are becoming obsolete, think of all of the ways we use our libraries now, and how we could continue to use them in the future. They won’t disappear if we fight for them and make them an integral part of our communities. After all, the library is everywhere.

(Photo: Monika Majkowska)

Published in: on February 26, 2014 at 3:56 am  Leave a Comment  
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