Introduction to Android

androidDo you have a tablet (not an iPad), or an Android SmartPhone (not at iPhone)? Join us at the Carleton Place Public Library on Saturday, March 25 at 2pm for an Introduction to Androids.

This seminar will introduce you to the basics of how to use an Android device. It will be a hands-on session, so be sure to bring your device with you…charged and already set up. (Unfortunately, we won’t have enough time to go through an initial set-up.) We’ll cover many things that will get you downloading apps, sending emails, or joining Facebook. And as always, if you need extra help, you can sign up for one of our sessions with our resident tech-spert Caroline.

Registration for this workshop is required, and it will fill up fast, so please call us at 257-2702.

Creating Great Characters

2This is the second in our Winter Writing Series, and is for people who are interested in making more out of the characters they’re writing.

Join us on Tuesday, February 21 from 6-7pm for an interesting workshop on how to write great characters into your books or stories. Adults only, please. Registration is a must, so call us at 257-2702, or drop by the library for more information.

Legacy Journaling

weave-your-wisdom-for-generations-to-come-intoWe’re so excited to be able to have a special visitor, Canadian author Heather Tucker, share her expertise with us about legacy journaling on Wednesday, March 1st from 6-8pm. Heather is the author of THE CLAY GIRL, a story where imagination, creativity, and everyday heroes create an unforgettable legacy, a novel which is garnering praise left and right!

Heather will be helping participants to share their stories in creative ways that will allow them to pass down the journals through generations. She says,

You don’t have to be a writer, an artist, or a public speaker. If you have a memory or two, the ability to doodle with a pen or cut out a favourite quote, if you’re up for a bit of fun and laughter, then you have everything you need to begin a legacy journal.

Legacy journaling is more than recording genealogy and events. Using colour and collage, words and whimsy, wise quotes and simple strokes, the essence of what makes you, you, emerges. A legacy journal is not something you work at, it is all about imaginative play. The workshop will be hands on and provide resources and prompts to get you started.

Legacy journaling is a triple treat. Journaling helps us process feelings and makes sense of our lives. Play reduces stress, makes us smarter, and slows dementia. And recording for posterity our thoughts, joys, accomplishments, challenges, gratitudes…fosters meaning and purpose.

This two-hour event will be free, but registration is a MUST.  You can call us at the library to register today at 257-2702.  Heather will also be selling copies of THE CLAY GIRL for $20, cash or cheque, so bring along your funds if you’d like to grab up a copy. (Maybe she’ll even sign it!)

claygirlThis hands-on workshop is presented in partnership with the Carleton Place and Beckwith Heritage Museum as part of the Canada 150 Celebrations. Jennifer Irwin will be bringing along a selection of journals from our local collection to highlight the stories of Carleton Place through the years. We can’t wait to see what she brings!

museum_logo_2011-150x150Get your journaling on! #Canada150

Blind Date with a Book

16195594_1241718475864146_2420850322450417109_nIt’s that time of year again….Blind Date with a Book! We’ve found our favourites from the last year, and packaged them up in pretty paper and stickers! If you drop by the library anytime between now and the end of February, we’d love it if you took one home.

Some of the books have a little blurb on them to give you a hint, but why not be wild and pick one up because you like the look of the decorations? Maybe you’ll fall in love with a new author. Or maybe it’ll be a bore. But either way, it’s a lot of fun and a nice way to make the month go by a little faster.

We have a nice selection of books for adults–both fiction and non-fiction, and books for kids (8 years and older), and teens. All of them are good. Keep an open mind, and you’ll have fun.

16143316_1241719109197416_2926013362927477432_n 16179843_1241718745864119_6040080664942583363_oHappy Blind Dating!

 

Prize for Unpublished Works

tidewater-banner-newIt’s difficult for authors to break into publishing, and while many now turn to self-publishing, the tasks involved can be daunting and without reward. But there is a new competition for unpublished manuscripts by Canadian authors that offers a prize of book cover design, editing and layout assistance, as well as a debut at the Whistler Writer’s Festival in the fall of 2017. Could there be a better prize?

The WIBA Manuscript Competition began only recently, offered originally to self-published books in Canada. But the organizers said that many of the entries, while showing great merit, needed a lot of work. They decided that an earlier approach would allow the best books to really shine, and give them a chance to grow once in bookstores.

There is just over one month left to submit an entry to the competition, and the rules and requirements can be found right here.  If you have a finished book, you can submit the first 5000 words and a full synopsis (up to 500 words), to the competition for adjudication. What a great opportunity!

Book Club for Two

pz-th3jzic8-daria-nepriakhinaLibraries are natural places for book clubs. We have two that are held here within our building, and we get books for several more clubs that hold their meetings in living rooms. The act of reading a book and discussing it is such an enjoyable thing. If you think it’s similar to those high school English class discussions, think again. (Plus, a lot of clubs have snacks involved, so it’s even better.)

But book clubs can come with some down sides, too. Some are quite strict about everyone reading the book before coming to the meetings. And others have a dedicated “chair” who will control the meeting, right down to discussion questions, rather than letting the discourse flow naturally. This can be a bit of a turn-off for some, and often, they’ll look elsewhere for another club.

What about starting your own club? How many people does it have to have? As it turns out, there are no real rules on this. Usually an active book club thrives from having a nice round number of people (10-15), as not everyone can make it each time. It’s also nice to have a wide variety of ages involved, but that will depend on the members themselves.

This is where Amy Cserni and Sara Haddow’s book club is really interesting. The pair met almost thirty-five years ago in high school, and started the unusual routine of reading books out loud to each other. They continued to do this for many years, getting together to read everything from classics to popular fiction. But when Cserni moved across the province, the book club for two was not to be dissolved. Instead of getting together to read out loud, the pair began reading to each other over the phone. Isn’t that a great idea? You can hear a fabulous documentary called “Telephone Books” by Alisa Siegel, by clicking on this link.

Now nothing can stop you from starting up your own book club!