War Revisited

August marks the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I and Canada’s part in it. Over on our sister blog, Carleton Place Local History: Make the Connection, we’ve been doing a HUGE series on the events leading up to the war, as well as details of how the war played out as written in the Carleton Place Herald during that time.

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If you haven’t been following the blog, you’ll want to read back through many of the interesting posts. Our resident genealogist and local history expert, Shirley, has been compiling and regaling us with snippets from the newspaper regarding Carleton Place during that time period.  They are often quite humorous and always fascinating, so take a few minutes to really get into the articles.  You’ll be able to see actual articles there as they appeared in the newspaper as well.

If you’re looking for some great information regarding this anniversary, we have many new books in the library on the subject, including some for children and teens. Take a minute to look in the display window, and let us know if you’re interested in reading something. We’d be happy to let you borrow it!

 

Do You Need a Ghostorian?

Earlier this week, I came across an interview on the Yes and Yes website with personal historian, Rachael Rifkin. What is a personal historian, you might ask? She talks about it as being “part ghost writer, part historian”, hence the term ‘ghostorian’. She interviews people about their lives and puts together a chronicle in book format, complete with photos, to help preserve family stories. It’s almost like writing a biography, but about a regular person.  And as it turns out, there is a marketplace for this type of work.

People love family stories, but often the stories tend to disappear when our relatives pass away. And while it might seem simple enough to jot down the details, it can be more complex to make the story into something comprehensible and available to other family members. Personal historians will interview people, whether it’s a grandparent, a celebration of a new baby, or another important event, and then put everything together into a book format. They’ll take the time to organize photos and really pull out the important bits of information to make the history sound like a great piece of non-fiction. It might take months for a small project, or years for something larger, but wouldn’t it be worthwhile to protect something that could be passed down for generations?

If you do genealogy, this could be a really interesting way to branch off and focus on one of your immediate family members. Or if you had letters from a great-grandmother, it might be a nice way to show her story from beginning to end.

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There are plenty of places online where you can find a personal historian, including the Association of Personal Historians . You can even check out Rachael’s own website to see what she offers.  She even has samples of some of the books she’s put together.

Are there people in your family you’d love to do this with? Don’t wait until it’s too late!

 

Remember

Today is the 70th anniversary of D-Day, the historic invasion on Normandy’s beaches  June 6, 1944.  At the library, we have a fascinating display of articles from that time period, as well as a number of books on the subject.  We even have a poem by our very own Joe McNeill which tells a heart-felt story about his father and the D- Day invasion.

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Best of all, you can pop over to our sister blog, Carleton Place Local History, to read a fascinating commemorative article about this moment and history, and see more of the photos. If you don’t visit this blog on a regular basis, you might want to take a few minutes to really look through past posts. This is your best spot to find out more about the history of Carleton Place and the people who have lived here. History is fascinating!

Celebrate Your Heritage!

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It’s Heritage Week and what better way to celebrate than to do some research on your own family history? We’re offering some great help to get you started in your quest to figure out who your ancestors were. Drop by the library tomorrow night (Wednesday, February 19th) anytime from 5:30pm – 7:30pm for some one-on-one time with our genealogy specialist, Shirley! She’ll get you started on Ancestry.com, show you how to begin your search and give you lots of pointers to make your search even better!

You’ll need some basic computer skills, a name and some dates, and be prepared to have fun! And if you’re already doing research, why not donate copies of your information to the library for other patrons who might be looking for local families? You could also drop the information off to the Carleton Place & Beckwith Heritage Museum! If you’re interested in genealogy, you should also check out the Carleton Place Public Library Local History blog!

We wish we could clone Shirley, but you might want to call ahead to make sure she’s available when you arrive. It’s going to be a fun evening.

What Were They Reading?

It’s always interesting to see what people are reading…whether they’re famous or not-so-famous. But how about what our ancestors were reading? At the library, Shirley is compiling a great series called “What Were They Reading?” on the Carleton Place Local History Blog.

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Find out what people in our community associated with our library’s history were reading back in the late 1800’s or early 1900’s. Did they enjoy fiction? Historical non-fiction? Political books? The classics? Keep up with this fascinating series which begins    here.

 

CLAUDIA COUTU RADMORE – POETRY READING EVENT!

 On Wednesday, March 20, 2013 we invite you to the library for a poetry reading by Claudia Coutu Radmore, author of

a minute or two/without remembering.’

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Join us for an inspiring and evocative evening as Claudia transports us back in time to 1672 when her first French ancestor sailed to New France!

Walk in their shoes, listen to their stories, and experience history!

A minute or two/without remembering takes us from Claudia’s seventh great grandmother, Marguerite de Laplace, one of the ‘daughters’ of the king of France, sent to New France to marry a fur trader; to the Cottu family’s relation to Louis Riel; through the ten year Iroquois threat when the family moved into Montreal for safety; ending with the heartbreaking Seven Years’ War, and its aftermath.

I have come to discover that Claudia is a multi-facetted and multi-talented woman. Born and raised in Montreal, Claudia has spent her life as an educator, an artist, and not least of all, a very accomplished wordsmith.

In 1984 she graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Queens University, Kingston.  She has taught elementary school, high school, and adult education in Quebec and Ontario, and trained pre-school teachers as a CUSO volunteer in Vanuatu 1985-1988.

Claudia paints portraits and landscapes in oils, and writes poetry.  She is well known for her Japanese-form poems, as well as for her lyric poetry.  Claudia has edited the Haiku Canada Anthology for several years, is the owner/editor of Bondi Press, and is the president of KaDo, Ottawa’s haiku group.

Author of Your Hands Discover Me (2010), a minute or two/without remembering (2010), and Accidentals (2011), Claudia also edited letters written to her by Leonard Budgell from Labrador, who was a fur trader for the Hudson’s Bay Company, writing the forward to his book “Arctic Twilight” which was published in 2008.  Now retired, Claudia has made Carleton Place her home since 2004. As these are just some of the highlights of Claudia’s career, please visit her website at http://claudiacouturadmore.ca for more info.

So, please join us Wednesday, March 20, 2013, 7-9 p.m. as we listen to the voices of Claudia’s ancestors.   It’s free – just call 613-257-2702 to reserve your spot!

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